Skip to content

This project aims to deliver a small number of key outputs contributing to a wider investigation into the support available to students, staff and researchers to enhance digital literacy. There are two strands to the project. One is co-ordinated by Research Information Network (RIN) on behalf of Research Information and Digital Literacies Coalition (RIDLs), the other by SCONUL under the JISC Developing Digital Literacies (DDL) programme.

The RIN strand focuses on the identification and promotion of good practice in information handling and data management training and development across the HE and research sectors. Its aim is to identify a representative sample of case studies to illustrate information and data management training in Higher Education (including those already documented in earlier research). The scope of these case studies will relate specifically to HE researchers from postgraduate students to senior researchers (including supervisors).

The SCONUL strand aims to identify, harvest, and use materials to progress the development of digital professional expertise. To ensure that both strands retain clear foci, while minimising duplication of effort, the emphasis for the RIDLs programme will be on the identification and promotion of good practice in information literacy in HE, and, for the SCONUL/JISC funded activity, on enhancing the digital scholarship skills of information professionals, using the SCONUL baseline survey definition: “Digital scholarship: the ability to participate in emerging academic, professional and research practices that depend on digital systems. For example, use of digital content (including digitised collections of primary and secondary material as well as open content) in teaching, learning and research, use of virtual learning and research environments, use of emergent technologies in research contexts, open publication and the awareness of issues around content discovery, authority, reliability, provenance, licence restrictions, adaption/repurposing and assessment of sources." It is anticipated that the SCONUL strand will identify gaps in provision and efforts will be made to make proposals on how these might best be filled. These proposals will be targeted towards SCONUL members and other information professional stakeholders in an effort to guide them in developing and maintaining services and resources which enable digital scholarship.

Mapping Resources to Competences – report

Mapping resources to competencies (link to PDF)

In order to assess and benchmark the effectiveness of its own digital presence, its members’ digital literacies and to propose changes to professional development where appropriate, SCONUL has been working as a participating professional association in the JISC Developing Digital Literacies programme, which runs from July 2011 to December 2013. During this process SCONUL has drawn upon the considerable expert advice available within its community, and worked in close collaboration with peer organisations and specific project outputs to explore new approaches to embedding digital literacy in working practices.

This downloadable document [Mapping resources to competencies (PDF)] explores resources and developments around the JISC Developing Digital Literacies (DDL) programme through a SCONUL lens. It considers the outcomes of the SCONUL baseline survey (2012) and maps key findings from the survey to relevant resources available through the JISC Design Studio resource, which collates project and association outputs from the DDL programme. The DDL programme has generated a large number of resources. This document is designed to help SCONUL members focus on those most relevant to them in the pursuit of developing digital literacies.

The threads that tie these outputs together are based on taking a strategic perspective to institutional change based on ‘inter-departmental multi-stakeholder conversations’ – involving not only librarians but other services as well as faculty and students in a unified process which acknowledges that digital literacies are not the sole ‘property’ of one department but the responsibility of the wider academic community. These conversations can be facilitated through careful examination of many of the links to resources in this document – and many more can be found on the JISC Design Studio.

Developing networks and collaborations through these conversations will enable a cooperative stance and an informed approach is more likely to amplify the voice of the library in these conversations. This will help maintain librarians’ relevance in the changing information landscape. Following and citing good practice examples will continue to contribute towards making good practice common practice, and adopting and adapting formal CPD frameworks will contribute towards strategically meeting these aims. Using up-to-date tools for staff and student development will keep libraries on the cutting edge of development and delivery of digital literacies, and the more widespread use and continuing development of our Seven Pillars, and the new Digital Literacy Lens, will help to unify the sector and provide our stakeholders with a consistent message.

A discussion of this work can be found in the current issue of CILIP Update (December 2013)

Link

Information literacy good practice informing common practice

Information literacy good practice informing common practice

SCONUL Members Briefing summarising RILADS information literacy recommendations in user-friendly 4 page pdf format.

SCONUL Digital Lens

Readers will no doubt be aware of the SCONUL Digital Lens on the Seven Pillars of Information Literacy. Here’s a link if you would like to see it in full. I am looking for examples where this has been used in practice – whether this be in policy-making, teaching, information literacy delivery – whatever. Do drop me a line or tweet a link to @RILADS with any examples. Many thanks!

Shortlisted resources – downloadable responses

A number of participants in the project have agreed that we may put their completed response forms online, giving a clear picture of how they addressed the RIDLs criteria used in the project. We are very grateful for this and hope readers will find this rich and detailed data valuable.

The research process involved two forms. The first form, ‘Describing and reviewing courses and resources’ was sent to a number of nominated participants. The forms which were returned were then analysed. Subsequently, an additional form ‘Criteria for assessing courses or resources’ was sent to a draft shortlist. Those returned were analysed and incorporated in the final shortlisting process.

CILIP Umbrella Jul 3 2013 presentation slides now available

Charlie Inskip’s UMBRELLA presentation (pdf) is now available for download. Thanks so much everybody who came along. Please contact me if there is anything you would like to discuss.

CILIP Umbrella conference, Manchester, Jul 2/3 2013

Charlie Inskip will be speaking at CILIP Umbrella conference on Wednesday July 3 at 1545 in room 1.219:

Are librarians delivering good practice in information literacy for postgraduates in UK Higher Education?

This paper presents breaking results from a Research Information Network / SCONUL collaborative project investigating support available to students, staff and researchers to enhance digital literacy in UK Higher Education. Formal criteria are used to describe, review and evaluate practice in information literacy and digital scholarship training in order to: provide a structured and recognised way of presenting such interventions in online resources and demonstrate their value, assess their suitability and usefulness as transferable resources, and identify how success has been measured, how needs have been met, and the outputs and outcomes of the courses or resources. The resources are mapped to Vitae’s Researcher Development Framework and SCONULS Digital Literacy lens. The findings from the research are discussed, focussing on the importance of librarians in designing and delivering innovative resources that meet user information needs, and the positive impacts of the outcomes of the delivery of identified resources. User feedback and awareness of a wider stakeholder context are discussed as important aspects of delivering good practice in life-long learning skills. It is anticipated that amongst the positive impacts of this research are that it will identify trends in provision and encourage good practice in information literacy and digital scholarship delivery.

Slides will be uploaded after the conference.

SCONUL Conference, Dublin, 20 June 2013 presentation

The slides from Charlie Inskip’s presentation at the SCONUL Conference, Dublin, Jun 20 2013 are now available in pdf from this link.

The session was in a workshop format and the discussions from the workshop have been incorporated into the slides in order to share the thoughts of the participants. There are numerous links on the slides. These are designed to aid the user in exploring possible resources and solutions in tackling the issues around the enhancement of digital scholarship skills of library and information professionals.

RILADS report

The report on our research is now available online, here:

RILADS final report, May 2013

This document summarises the work to date (Oct 2012 – Apr 2013) on the RIN / SCONUL information literacy and digital scholarship project known as RILADS (http://rilads.wordpress.com/). The aim of the project is to deliver a small number of key outputs contributing to a wider investigation into the support available to students, staff and researchers to enhance digital literacy. This report focuses on the first strand (RIN) looking at the identification and promotion of good practice in information training in UK HE. The promotion strategy, using social networks, print media and personal contact led to the gathering of a long list of 42 potential examples. Questionnaires, informed by the RIDLS criteria for describing and evaluating courses and resources, were sent to named people, predominantly from the area of Academic Library services, involved in delivering and developing these resources. 27 completed forms were returned.

The questions covered three main areas:

  • Who is the course or resource designed for, and why?
  • What knowledge, skills and competencies is the course or resource intended to provide?
  • How is the course or resource delivered?

A brief overview initial analysis of these was initially used to identify key themes and patterns in the data. The questionnaires were then analysed in more detail and a number of resources shortlisted and contacted for information relating to the evaluation of their resources.

It was confirmed from the results that the sample focused on post-graduate delivery. Generally, resources had an introductory and flexible multi-session multi-disciplinary focus, followed established pedagogic models, and concentrated on the learners’ current academic practice. A range of internal and external sources were used to assess learners’ demand for the resource, including student feedback, attendance statistics and national debate. Internal policy on researcher development is a strong driver. The current debate on OER and sharable resources is widely acknowledged, although not always practical.
The knowledge, skills and competencies raised in the SCONUL 7 Pillars of Information Literacy and Vitae’s Researcher Development Framework inform much of this development. Referencing, source evaluation, plagiarism, searching and dissemination are key areas, although much wider coverage is evident across the sample.

The courses and resources can be categorised into two discrete types, Classroom and Online, and these can take a blended learning approach. They are primarily directed and delivered by Library Services staff, with varying levels of input from other professional service departments (Graduate Schools, ISS, Teaching and Learning Development) and faculty. It is notable that the (Library Staff) respondents offered a wide range of additional skills they required (teaching, research, technical) in order to successfully deliver these resources. These skills were either gained through CPD or outsourced internally or externally. It was widely agreed that time is required to develop and deliver effective resources, although costs can also be an issue, reinforcing the culture of sharing materials.

In terms of assessing the resources, statistical evaluations and qualitative feedback are used to spot trends and iteratively develop resources to meet changing participant needs. The lack of an assessment element in these types of resources means it is difficult to determine changes in learners levels of skills / knowledge / competences. Additionally, because many of the resources are relatively new there is often insufficient data for detailed evaluation.

A number of self-selected information literacy resources have been evaluated using the RIDLs criteria, leading to a shortlisting of a selection of 15 good practice examples. This is not to say that every aspect of each of the shortlisted examples is perfect – this project is not about finding ‘the best’ information literacy resource – but the benefit of this selection is that those charged with developing resources to serve a similar need may efficiently access some examples – and ultimately, perhaps, that ‘good practice’ may become ‘common practice’. Various recommendations are made within the report, which may be of value to those planning to develop good practice resources. The value of the RIDLS criteria in this research has been to provide an analytical framework for such evaluations (for the researcher) and act as a reflective tool (for the developers/deliverers). Hopefully some of the recommendations and comments within the report, combined with a reflective look at the examples – and contact with their helpful representatives – may assist those attempting to deliver good practice information literacy in UK HE in 2013 and beyond.

Short list of good practice examples of Information Literacy delivery in UK HE

A number of self-selected information literacy resources have been evaluated using the RIDLs criteria, leading to a shortlisting of a selection of 15 good practice examples. This is not to say that every aspect of each of the shortlisted examples is perfect – this project is not about finding ‘the best’ information literacy resource – but the benefit of this selection is that those charged with developing resources to serve a similar need may efficiently access some examples – and ultimately, perhaps, that ‘good practice’ may become ‘common practice’. The value of the criteria in this research has been to provide an analytical framework for such evaluations (for the researcher) and act as a reflective tool (for the developers/deliverers). Hopefully some of the recommendations and comments within the report, combined with a reflective look at the examples – and contact with their helpful representatives – may assist those attempting to deliver good practice information literacy in UK HE in 2013 and beyond.

  • Cardiff UniversityEmbedded information literacyPostgraduate students, integration of information and digital literacies into the University Graduate College skills development programme
  • Cranfield UniversityOnline information literacy tutorialUndergraduate / postgraduate students, highly interactive online tutorials on a wide range of IL issues; attractively and imaginatively packaged.
  • Glasgow Caledonian UniversityPG IL module (‘Pilot’)Postdoc researchers, online tutorials on wide range of IL issues (developed for postdocs, but also suitable for graduate students).
  • Loughborough UniversityeMRSG: East Midlands Research Support Group: early career researchers, online interactive tutorials on disseminating research outputs and reference management. Resource developed jointly by four East Midlands HEIs.
  • LSEMY592Postgraduate students, structured 6-week course on many aspects of IL
  • Open University, Ready to researchPostgraduate students, a set of online tutorials, structured within a broad range of IL topics.
  • Oxford UniversityResearch Skills ToolkitPostgraduate students, a set of interactive online resources
  • University of BathInformation Skills for Research PostgraduatesPostgraduate students, extensive programme of courses throughout the academic year, mostly on literature searching, but also on copyright, plagiarism, use of databases. Some discipline-specific resources.
  • University of BirminghamRaising your research profileWorkshops on publishing, bibliometrics and social media.
  • University of DurhamTraining Resources 1213Postgraduate students, range of  IL courses
  • University of EdinburghResearch Data MANTRA coursePostgraduate students, online tutorials on all aspects of research data management.
  • University of ManchesterMedia & Information resourcePostgraduate students, researchers, podcast-based online resource covering wide range of IL issues.
  • University of NottinghamEffective Literature SearchingPostgraduate students (early stage), 5-day course on literature searching
  • University of SalfordSalford Postgraduate Research Training (SPoRT)Postgraduate researchers, wide-ranging programme of workshops reflecting the structure of the RDF; selected sessions available on aspects of IL.
  • University of WarwickDigital ResearcherEarly career researchers, module-based, 18-week online learning programme on social media in the research lifecycle.

SCONUL Annual Conference and AGM, Dublin, Jun 19-21

Findings of the work around the RILADS project will be  presented in a workshop at the SCONUL Annual Conference and AGM in Dublin on Thursday 20th June.

Abstract follows:

This workshop session will discuss one of the key findings of current research into information literacy in UK Higher Education.
While information literacy is of paramount importance in the changing information landscape, there are important issues raised in terms of information professionals’ digital scholarship skills. This research, funded by Research Information Network and SCONUL, investigates information and digital literacy in UK HE, which is mostly within the purview of librarians. It has found that there are a wide range of skills and competencies, including digital scholarship skills, required of staff which range beyond the ‘traditional’ job requirements of the librarian. These issues impact not only on CPD but on the very perception and definition of librarianship in the 21st century.
Slides will be uploaded to this site after the conference.
LibeRaCe's Library Blog

Coleg Llandrillo Cymru Library Blog Wales

infoliterati

for librarians, researchers and educators interested in information management

Amy's Scrap Bag: A Blog About Libraries, Archives, and History

A Blog About Libraries, Archives, and History wriiten by a history and library science graduate.

Designer Librarian

A blog about instructional design and technology in libraries.

The Disruptive Searcher

Exploring the world of searching

Eleni's First Steps

My learning adventures in Open Academic Practice

London Libraries Learning Research Reading Group

News and info about the reading group

DELILA Project Blog

Just another WordPress.com site

Research Information Literacy and Digital Scholarship

This blog contains information about the RIN / SCONUL research project, RILADS

Follow

Get every new post delivered to your Inbox.

Join 47 other followers